Imhotep (Asklepios) the Great Architect and Healer who became a God

Imhotep was the architect, astrologer, high priest and chief vizier of Pharaoh Djoser the second king of Egypt's third dynasty (circa 2650 BCE). His name means "The One Who Comes in Peace." Imhotep was born a commoner but it quickly became apparent that he was exceptionally smart, a true genius, and he rose through the … Continue reading Imhotep (Asklepios) the Great Architect and Healer who became a God

The Great Feline Deities

Probably the most well known Egyptian cat deity is Bastet (Bast) however there are also a number of other ancient Egyptian gods who were associated with cats. The goddess Neith was said to take the form of a cat occasionally and the goddesses Tefnut and Sekhmet were pictured as lions. An inscription in the Valley … Continue reading The Great Feline Deities

Wepwawet, the Opener of Ways

Listening to the coyotes communicating in howls and yips just yards away from our Sanctuary, brings to mind one of the most ancient Egyptian gods, Wepwawet (also known as Ap-aut and Sed) a wolf-like god whose worship originated in Upper Egypt. His name means "Opener of the Ways" and this has been interpreted as opening … Continue reading Wepwawet, the Opener of Ways

Heku and Healing

Egyptian medicine was the result of experimentation, observation,  and physical remedies which were supplemented by magical ones: Magic is effective together with medicine. Medicine is effective together with magic.From the Ebers Papyrus Incantations, prayers to the gods, and above all to Sekhmet, the goddess of healing, were often accompanied by herbal and other medicines to … Continue reading Heku and Healing

Seshat, Mistress of the Great Library

Seshat is named as one of the Seven Hathors. The Ancient Egyptians saw her as the Goddess of writing, historical records, accounting and mathematics, measurement and architecture. She was depicted with a headdress that is also her hieroglyph which may represent either a stylized flower or seven pointed star on a standard that is beneath … Continue reading Seshat, Mistress of the Great Library

Prayers to Nut, the Sky Goddess

Prayer to the Goddess Nut found at the entrance to Hatshepsut's tomb: "O my mother Nut, spread yourself over me, so that I may be placed among the imperishable stars and may never die...that my name might remain enduring in this temple forever and ever.” Utterance 432 - the Pyramid Texts (written circa 2500 BCE): … Continue reading Prayers to Nut, the Sky Goddess

Sekhmet-Bast-Re, Mother of the Gods

The Ancient Egyptians were very fond of cats, as I have shared in several posts. The worship of cats began with Sekhmet, over 5000 years ago, the fierce Goddess of war and the destroyer of the enemies of the sun god Re. She was believed to be the Mother of Gods and a creator goddess … Continue reading Sekhmet-Bast-Re, Mother of the Gods

Bastet, the Goddess of Protection

The Goddess Bastet was originally depicted as a savage lioness warrior goddess (circa 3000 BCE) who had the role of protecting the Pharaohs. After 1000 BCE, the Egyptians altered her image to the body of a woman and the head of a cat. Along with her change in appearance, she was also transformed into a … Continue reading Bastet, the Goddess of Protection

Ancient Egyptian Hymns, Poetry and the Songs of the Harpers

The distinction between songs, hymns and poetry in Ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyrus texts is not always clear. The term "song" is used for the writings which are depicted with musical instruments and if the songs are seen to have a clear connection with temples and festivals then they are usually described as hymns. … Continue reading Ancient Egyptian Hymns, Poetry and the Songs of the Harpers

The Shabaka Stone and Ptah the Divine

Egypt had been ravaged by foreign rulers for a period of 400 years after the end of the New Kingdom. A renewal of ancient Egyptian culture, philosophy and theology were desperately needed. The Pharaohs of the 25th Dynasty were Nubians and even though the Nubians had followed the Ancient Egyptian religion for 2000 years, they … Continue reading The Shabaka Stone and Ptah the Divine