Bes the Champion

Bes is a complex being who is both a deity and a demonic fighter. He was a god of war as well as protector of childbirth and the home; and he was associated with sexuality, humor, music and dancing. Bes is depicted as a bearded dwarf often shown sticking out his tongue and holding a … Continue reading Bes the Champion

Make Incense of Different Kinds of Sweet Herbs for Ra

On this day, according to the Cairo Calendar, it is suggested that we "make incense of different kinds of sweet herbs for Ra and his followers which will please him on this day." Therefore, I am making a new batch of Kyphi incense today. The burning of incense was integral to worship of the gods … Continue reading Make Incense of Different Kinds of Sweet Herbs for Ra

Egyptians Loved and Honored Their… Dogs!

According to Herodotus (and other sources), while the Ancient Egyptians loved their Cats, Dogs were even more loved and honored. It has been written that when a pet cat died, all those who lived in the home shaved their eyebrows. However, in a home in which a dog died, all would shave their entire head … Continue reading Egyptians Loved and Honored Their… Dogs!

Cleanliness (and Cosmetics) for the Gods

For the ancient Egyptians personal hygiene was an important cultural value. They bathed daily, shaved their heads to prevent lice or other problems, and regularly used cosmetics and perfumes. One's personal appearance was so important that there are spells in The Egyptian Book of the Dead that one cannot speak in the afterlife if one … Continue reading Cleanliness (and Cosmetics) for the Gods

“Fragrance of the Gods” Incense in Ancient Egypt

Fragrance has permeated the land and culture of Egypt for millennia. Beautiful scents and the burning of incense were intrinsic to the worship of the Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt. Large quantities of a variety of herbs and woods was burned daily in the temples throughout Egypt. The numerous reliefs and papyri depicting incense … Continue reading “Fragrance of the Gods” Incense in Ancient Egypt

Seshat and the Tree Spirits

Seshat is named as one of the Seven Hathors. The Ancient Egyptians saw her as the Goddess of writing, historical records, accounting and mathematics, measurement and architecture. She was depicted with a headdress that is also her hieroglyph which may represent either a stylized flower or seven pointed star on a standard that is beneath … Continue reading Seshat and the Tree Spirits

Heku and Healing

Egyptian medicine was the result of experimentation, observation,  and physical remedies which were supplemented by magical ones: Magic is effective together with medicine. Medicine is effective together with magic. From the Ebers Papyrus Incantations, prayers to the gods, and above all to Sekhmet, the goddess of healing, were often accompanied by herbal and other medicines … Continue reading Heku and Healing

Tawaret – The Great Female

Taweret was an ancient Egyptian goddess of maternity and childbirth, protector of women and children. She was known as "The Great Female," a fierce demonic fighter as well as a popular deity who guarded the mother and her newborn child. Tawaret was thought to assist women in labor and scare off demons that might harm … Continue reading Tawaret – The Great Female

Solar Re, Kek, Wenet and the Long Night Moon

Today, the shortest day of light and the longest night of darkness, Atum-Re meets me in various forms. To begin, Atum-Re's namesake, Re, greets me in the morning as he lounges on one of the solar arrays that grace and sustain our sanctuaries. Re loves to catch every bit of warmth and light from the … Continue reading Solar Re, Kek, Wenet and the Long Night Moon

Heku – Magical Stories (Part 2)

While the stories of Heku written on the Wescar Papyrus tell of miracles performed by the high priests, they also relate historical magical stories that have been carried forward from Ancient Egypt. Another story in the Westcar papyrus, as told at the royal court of Pharaoh Khufu  (25th century BCE) is as follows: Khafra stood … Continue reading Heku – Magical Stories (Part 2)