Seshat, Mistress of the Great Library

Seshat is named as one of the Seven Hathors. The Ancient Egyptians saw her as the Goddess of writing, historical records, accounting and mathematics, measurement and architecture. She was depicted with a headdress that is also her hieroglyph which may represent either a stylized flower or seven pointed star on a standard that is beneath … Continue reading Seshat, Mistress of the Great Library

Prayers to Nut, the Sky Goddess

Prayer to the Goddess Nut found at the entrance to Hatshepsut's tomb: "O my mother Nut, spread yourself over me, so that I may be placed among the imperishable stars and may never die...that my name might remain enduring in this temple forever and ever.” Utterance 432 - the Pyramid Texts (written circa 2500 BCE): … Continue reading Prayers to Nut, the Sky Goddess

Sokar, Falcon God of the Underworld

Sokar was a protective falcon god of Memphis, originally an agricultural deity, and one of the oldest gods of ancient Egypt. He evolved from a god of agriculture and growth to the god of craftsmanship. Ultimately, Sokar came to be a God of the Necropolis and rose to considerable importance as an afterlife deity. The … Continue reading Sokar, Falcon God of the Underworld

Heh and Hehet, God and Goddess of Infinity

Before the world was formed, there was a watery mass of dark, directionless chaos and in this chaos lived the Ogdoad [Ennead] of Hermopolis, four frog gods and four snake goddesses of chaos. These deities were Nun and Naunet (water), Amun and Amaunet (invisibility), Heh and Hehet (infinity) and Kek and Kauket (darkness). The water … Continue reading Heh and Hehet, God and Goddess of Infinity

Wadjet, Supreme Goddess of Lower Egypt

Wadjet is one of the oldest deities in the Egyptian pantheon and a greatly respected protective goddess. She was worshipped beginning in the Predynastic Period (c. 6000-3150 BCE) and by the Early Dynastic Period (c. 3150-2613 BCE) was the supreme deity of Lower Egypt. Wadjet was the daughter of Re and featured in one of … Continue reading Wadjet, Supreme Goddess of Lower Egypt

Anhur, the Warrior Sky God

Anhur was a warrior sky-god whose primary worship center was near Abydos. His name literally means "He Who Brings Back The Distant Goddess" which is a reference to the story about his retrieval of the Eye of Re from Nubia. Different versions of the legend feature different feline goddesses, but the plot is always the … Continue reading Anhur, the Warrior Sky God

Qebhet, Goddess of Purification

Qebhet was the goddess of freshness and purification. She was known as the "wandering goddess" or the "lost child." Her father was Anubis and she helped her father in his role as the god of embalming. She was the personification of cool, refreshing water because she brought water to the souls of the dead in … Continue reading Qebhet, Goddess of Purification

Sepa, the Centipede God

Sepa, the Centipede God, was a protective fertility deity whose worship began in the Predynastic Period (c. 6000-3150 BCE). As centipedes are venomous, Sepa was considered to have power over other venomous animals and could be invoked for protection against snake bites and scorpion stings. Sepa was sometimes referred to as the “centipede of Horus” … Continue reading Sepa, the Centipede God

Ihy the Musician and Perfect Child of the Goddess Hathor

Ihy, whose name means "sistrum player" or "musician" was the personification of the joy associated with the use of this sacred instrument. He was also the "perfect child" and had an impressive lineage. His mother was mostly considered to be Hathor, known as the "Lady of Dance" among other epithets, however he was also regarded … Continue reading Ihy the Musician and Perfect Child of the Goddess Hathor

Sia, Hu, and Heku – Intelligence, Power and Magic

Sia was the divine personification of perception and thoughtfulness, which is necessary in order to understand the truth. He represented the heart which was considered the seat of emotion, thought, and character. Sia formed a dyad with Hu, who represented the tongue, and was the personification of the authority of the spoken word. Sia and … Continue reading Sia, Hu, and Heku – Intelligence, Power and Magic